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Jewish dating rituals

When you read the verses in the Bhagavad Gita in your time of grief, they speak to you.

In recent years, people have substituted other activities in lieu of the Shraddha, such as feeding the poor or giving donations to orphanages.

Feeding people in memory of the dead is considered particularly meritorious.

As Narayanan explains, "Rituals give us a way of cathartically dealing with our grief.

A traditional Jewish wedding is full of meaningful rituals, symbolizing the beauty of the relationship of husband and wife, as well as their obligations to each other and to the Jewish people.

In most Hindu families, the body is bathed immediately after death, sometimes by women in the family.

Hinduism, like other great religions, has specific rituals for honoring the deceased and addressing a family's grief. Vasudha Narayanan, Professor of Religion at the University of Florida and head of the American Academy of Religion, described Hindu ceremonies in a conversation with Beliefnet: In most cases, the procedures are conducted almost immediately, within a 24-hour period.When a parent has died and the children live far away, other family members hold the body until the children arrive to do the last rites.

In Hinduism, they are conducted every month for a year after the death, based on tithi (the phase of the moon), and then once annually by the same person who performed the last rites."There is a saying that the fire in the house is not lit until the fire in the cremation pyre has gone out," explains Narayanan. There are very specific dietary injunctions also as to what people can and cannot eat, especially the person who has performed the last rites. The foods are considered satvic (pure) foods." In the place where the person died, a lamp is lit to light the way for the departed soul and water is kept there for its nourishment.The next day the ashes are collected and immersed in a river--particularly where two rivers meet; in the ocean; or scattered over the earth in India. There are a certain number of days, depending on the community, after which the family is re-integrated into the society," says Narayanan.In Vedic times, there were incidents of the putrika--a daughter who could assume the role of a son.In later years, the religious patriarchy interpreted the putrika as the grandson, and reserved the conducting of the last rites for males.The soul never dies and we have discarded this body because the soul is here and always will be.