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How old is the right age to start dating

But if there are too many neutrons, the nucleus is potentially unstable and decay may be triggered.

This happens at any time when addition of the fleeting "weak nuclear force" to the ever-present electrostatic repulsion exceeds the binding energy required to hold the nucleus together.

Very careful measurements in laboratories, made on VERY LARGE numbers of U-235 atoms, have shown that each of the atoms has a chance of decaying during about 704,000,000 years.

For example, U-235 is an unstable isotope of uranium that has 92 protons and 143 neutrons in the nucl eus of each atom.

Through a series of changes within the nucleus, it emits several particles, ending up with 82 protons and 125 neutrons.

That chance of decay is very small, but it is always present and it never changes.

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The teacher should tell the students that there are two basic principles used by geologists to determine the sequence of ages of rocks.They are: Principle of superposition: Younger sedimentary rocks are deposited on top of older sedimentary rocks.

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This first time of shaking represents one half life, and all those pieces of candy that have the printed M facing up represent a change to the daughter isotope.Where the amounts of parent and daughter isotopes can be accurately measured, the ratio can be used to determine how old the rock is, as shown in the following activities.Part 2a Activity — At any moment there is a small chance that each of the nuclei of U-235 will suddenly decay.2) To familiarize students with the concept of half-life in radioactive decay.3) To have students see that individual runs of statistical processes are less predictable than the average of many runs (or that runs with relatively small numbers involved are less dependable than runs with many numbers).In general, with the exception of the single proton that constitutes the nucleus of the most abundant isotope of hydrogen, the number of neutrons must at least equal the number of protons in an atomic nucleus, because electrostatic repulsion prohibits denser packing of protons.