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Dating old bottles jars

Maybe some type of alcohol extract..the emphasis on the alcohol.

$250 - This bottle is one of the oldest I have for sale and among the earliest embossed patent medicines bottles made in the United States.

It is also one of a small handful of over 4 sided medicine bottles that are embossed on every side - six embossed sides in this case.

The lip is a short, tapered banded example that was tooled or rolled over to the outside to form it.

The surface of the bottle is very wavy, lumpy and crude which is largely a function it appears of the rough, unpolished surface of the likely iron mold it was made it.

This bottle is a light to medium amber in color, has a very crudely applied "oil" finish or lip ("globby-ness" completely - 360˚ - around the base of the finish), smooth indented base, and is 9.5" tall; these bottle date from between 1875 and maybe 1885 based on manufacturing features.

dating old bottles jars-26

Unlike the Mc Lean's product, this bottle has the noted embossing spread over both sides of the body..again to the delight of collectors. - This is a very nice example of what is reported to be a Western blown tonic bottle and possibly related to the California Dr. The shape, size and embossing pattern was probably chosen to emulate the way more popular "" though the mold engraver (or Dr. ) had a problem correctly spelling purifier choosing to spell it "Purifyer" to the delight of modern bottle collectors.

However, it is very hard to see due to the noted crude "as blown" surface and is non-distracting.These bottles are of a glass type that apparently stains easily and/or are all found in areas (SC) that are prone to staining glass with highly basic or alkaline soils?With the cleaning - which did not compromise the still very bold embossing - this bottle is near mint, the only issue being some very, very minor roughness with no depth (more felt than seen) to one side of the lip rim that is likely to have been in-making.And if that were not enough, it is also unusual in that it has "left hand" embossing, i.e., it reads from the base to the shoulder (and best read holding it in ones left hand) whereas the vast majority of vertically embossed bottles read "right handed." According to the late John Odell's book on pontiled medicines (a great book BTW!) the product first claimed to have been sold in 1830 and continued (apparently) until about 1843 when it was renamed "Rowan's Improved Tonic..." and the bottles (likely) began to be embossed as such (I believe IMPROVED / TONIC on one side? Not sure of the precise dates of manufacture, but suffice to say 1830s and 1840s...early!I think these are neat reminders of the hand-made nature of these mouth-blown bottles. Incidentally, wire grass (wiregrass) is a native grass to South Carolina (and elsewhere) - Aristita stricta - which makes decent cattle forage when young, is closely linked with the native Longleaf pine ecosystems in that area, and from which I have absolutely no idea how they would make any type of medicine!