skip to content »

specbooks.ru

Chinese english sex chat

It said "Across the Great Wall, we can reach every corner in the world" (simplified Chinese: By June 2014, there were 632 million internet users in the country and a penetration rate of 46.9%. in its global leadership in terms of installed telecommunication bandwidth in 2011.

Later dominant telecom providers also started to provide Internet services.

In 2015 January, China added seven new access points to the world’s Internet backbone, adding to the three points that connect through Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou.

Other Internet service providers such as the human resource service provider 51job and the electronic commerce web sites such as are less popular but more successful on their specialty. All websites that operate in China with their own domain name must have an ICP license from the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology.

Because the PRC government blocks many foreign websites, many homegrown copycats of foreign websites have appeared. As of 2015, Google has limited to no presence in China.

The majority of Chinese Internet users restrict their use of the internet to Chinese websites, as most of the population has a lack of foreign language skills.

The rapidly increasing number of Internet users in China has also generated a large online shopping base in the country.

Users form their communities based on different interests.Bulletin boards on portals or elsewhere, chat rooms, instant messaging groups, blogs and microblogs are very active, while photo-sharing and social networking sites are growing rapidly.Some Wikis such as the Soso Baike and Baidu Baike are "flourishing".Baidu is the leading search engine in China, while most web portals also provide search opportunities like Before 2014, Googlers in China were linked to Google Hong Kong from its page because of an issue with hackers reportedly based in Mainland China.As of June 4, 2014, Google became officially blocked without the use of a virtual private network (VPN), an effect still in place to date.China's first foray into global cyberspace was an email (not TCP/IP based and thus technically not Internet) sent on 20 September 1987 to University of Karlsruhe.